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My Sea of Green has Arrived

May 25, 2012 Leave a comment
Fierce Competition for Sunlight

Fierce Competition for Sunlight

Things have been pretty busy on the farm, but there is one truth that is self evident: The shelves in the greenhouse are covered in a healthy green mass of plants yearning for the sun. All of the hard work invested in constructing this gem of a building, starting with diging the foundation by hand all the way through attaching the clear panels with help from Nate, is paying off once again. The planning is detailed, the outcome is not always assured, but with a little faith, lots of help, and some good dirt, it’s all working out ….. [ Continue Reading at I.T. Farmers new home: http://itfarmersblog.com?p=2620 ]

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All Volunteer Army

June 24, 2011 4 comments
Volunteer Army

Volunteer Army

I had started constructing a small area in which I hoped to get my Strawberry plants growing year after year. I may have made a mistake however when I choose the location for this berry patch. I broke ground where I used to have a small chicken coop and compost pile. I often supplemented my chicken food with garden goodies, and some of the seeds must have found their way into the ground, where they have been growing like mad.

Zucchini ?

Zucchini ?

I’m a bit undecided how to respond to this All Volunteer Invading Army. I’m sure the plants are squash, but I’m not sure what kind. If they are Zucchini, I would welcome a very early treat, but if they are winter squash, I’d be more concerned for my Strawberries. I’ve spent about $20 on five different types of strawberries and other supplies to get them to grow great, and I was really looking to make an all Strawberry patch. For now I guess I can let them grow a bit more, and check on my berry plants daily. If the berries seem to be struggling, I’ll just have to choose: Berries or very early Zucchini.

Squash Line-up

September 7, 2010 Leave a comment
Winter Squash

Winter Squash

It’s that time of year again, time to wonder just what we’ve grown. I can identify the first two from the left, as Baby Blue Hubbard, and Acorn Squash. I’m not sure what the third one is, but the forth is Waltham Butternut, and the Fifth is Spaghetti Squash. So, I’ve got about half of their names, but they are all Winter Squash, which should keep well into the winter, if stored properly. On a humorous note, I’ve found my sprinkler which was buried in a sea of green for so long.

Pile of Squash

Pile of Squash

Since the plants have started to die, we decided to pile up the squash so that it could be more easily managed. There are two piles shown, one of which will become food for my pig: Babe. These squashes have small bite marks, which I’m told are the remnants of curious chipmunks.  The others I’ve loaded into the trunk of my car and transported to my Mother’s house, as she has more room for storing this motley mix. I had nearly a trunk load of squash, and was quite proud of the bounty.

Zen Harvest

August 18, 2010 Leave a comment
Ying Yang Beans

Ying Yang Beans

Here are some of the beans I harvested today. They are dry beans, with a distinctive Ying – Yang looking pattern on the bean itself. I planted these in the hopes of getting my neices excited about the garden, and they have harvested a bunch even before I had. The bean pod looks like any other string bean, green in color, yellowing when they are ripe.

Winter Squashes, and Corn

Winter Squashes, and Corn

At the end of the garden, we’ve planted Winter Squashes of many varieties. When the plants first started growing from seed, they were way behind schedule, so I watered them daily, and also side dressed them with rabbit manure. After a few days of slow growth, I added goat manure on top of the already potent rabbit dung. I would soak the plants till water began pooling, and with a few degress of slope, it took a while to completely douse them. The sun co-operated very nicely in those days, and the heat really got those little plants growing. I took the tripod out to the garden, and took this picture. Keep in mind the tripod is nearly four feet tall. Those little plants have turned into winter squash warriors with huge green leaves. They grew so fast that I lost my sprinkler under the leaves, and there is no way to walk through the rows between plant varieties.