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Corn, Celery & Onions

June 29, 2011 Leave a comment
Corn

Corn

My corn is about 8 inches tall, and I really don’t think it will reach the “knee high by July” standard that most farmers judge their crops by. I’m not worried however, as this corn is more in the range of 70-80 day corn then 90+. I had similar sized corn last year, and had way too much then. This years corn plot is about a third of the size as last year, and should still deliver plenty.

Celery

Celery

This is the first year I’ve had celery plants in the garden. Last year, I tried to plant the seeds in a row and it didn’t work too well. Celery is a slow growing plant, and should be started 11 weeks earlier then the last frost. The little plant above is approximately 20 weeks old, and less then 6 inches tall.

Yellow Onions

Yellow Onions

 My onions were also planted later then usual, but I have no fear. I’ll soon be applying a layer of well rotted manure to large swathes of the garden. I can almost bet all of these plants will “pop” soon afterwards.
Categories: Celery, Corn, Onions

Children in the Corn

September 8, 2010 4 comments
Kids Goofing Off in the Corn

Kids Goofing Off in the Corn

In the past, I’ve always tried to keep the kids out of the garden, as they always seemed to step on my most prized plants. This year, I’ve taken on a new mindset: Kids should have fun in the garden, so when it was time to pick some corn, I knew just who to ask for help. They in turn decided that corn could not be picked with out some puppy power, and if you look close in these photos, you can see them.

Kids, Puppies and Corn

Kids, Puppies and Corn

Since the corn field has giant chunks of corn knocked over, the kids have been treating the area as a playground.  I’m hoping to teach the kids about healthy food, not by putting it on their plate, but instead by growing it all around them. They can select what is appealing to them, and I know they will eat well. I should note, the kids shown are my nieces and nephews.

The Lil Gardener

The Lil Gardener

Above is the Little Gardener. I had a hard time getting pictures of him because he loved treating the corn as a huge maze. When I finally tracked him down, he was smiling as usual.

Corn

Corn

After harvesting a garbage bag full of this wondrous food, I took it to my Mother’s home for her to freeze it. I though it was neat how the Blue Dent corn mixed with the corn next to it, which has me believe that the pollen for each kernel must be different, as there are three color’s shown.

Categories: Corn, People Tags:

Crop Circles ?

August 27, 2010 1 comment
Corn, Greenhouse in the background

Corn, Greenhouse in the background

My niece Jennifer can be a bit of a trickster, so when her and Jessica informed me that a space ship landed in my corn and made a crop circle, I took the news with a grain of salt and didn’t believe them. They insisted that I go look, and I was waiting for one of their friends to come jumping out from the corn in an elaborate attempt to startle me.

Room Sized Area Knocked Over

Room Sized Area Knocked Over

What I found was not other worldly, nor in the shape of a circle, but it surely was worth pondering about. Several areas of corn plants the size of a decent living room had been knocked over. Many of the ears of corn in this section of the garden were not yet ready for picking, and would be lost. It’s not a big problem, as we got carried away and planted way too many rows of corn, but I am left wondering who or what did this ?

More Damage

More Damage

The damage seemed to flow in from the top of the garden, meandering back and forth, and finally exitting near the right edge of the garden. I imagine the only animal large enough to do this would be a bear, or a group of deer bedding down for the night. I couldn’t find any paw or hoof marks, so I’m left wondering: Could wind do this ?

It’s not all bad though, I’ve informed Jenny that she can feed the stalks and underdeveloped corn to her goat, and she smilled from ear to ear. She’s been thinking about getting five more goats, and this would be the supply of food to feed them till she has her mother take her to buy more feed.  We’ve surely planted enough for all, even the animals.

Categories: Corn, Wild Animals Tags:

Zen Harvest

August 18, 2010 Leave a comment
Ying Yang Beans

Ying Yang Beans

Here are some of the beans I harvested today. They are dry beans, with a distinctive Ying – Yang looking pattern on the bean itself. I planted these in the hopes of getting my neices excited about the garden, and they have harvested a bunch even before I had. The bean pod looks like any other string bean, green in color, yellowing when they are ripe.

Winter Squashes, and Corn

Winter Squashes, and Corn

At the end of the garden, we’ve planted Winter Squashes of many varieties. When the plants first started growing from seed, they were way behind schedule, so I watered them daily, and also side dressed them with rabbit manure. After a few days of slow growth, I added goat manure on top of the already potent rabbit dung. I would soak the plants till water began pooling, and with a few degress of slope, it took a while to completely douse them. The sun co-operated very nicely in those days, and the heat really got those little plants growing. I took the tripod out to the garden, and took this picture. Keep in mind the tripod is nearly four feet tall. Those little plants have turned into winter squash warriors with huge green leaves. They grew so fast that I lost my sprinkler under the leaves, and there is no way to walk through the rows between plant varieties.

Country Corn

August 17, 2010 Leave a comment
Cooking Corn

Cooking Corn

My little sister (in height, not age) is on vacation for the week, so it’s her time to relax and enjoy life a bit. She decided to start a small bon-fire, and invited a bunch of friends over. Maurice’s house is near the other end of the garden, and the fire pit is only feet away from the strawberry patch. It didn’t take long for me, and everyone else to start eyeing up the corn in the garden, and the kids were all too eager to wade though the garden to help me pick it. I had a long train of helpers following me, as I instructed them where to step. Picking the corn was easy, but making sure they were all holding the same amount was a bit of a challange. 

When we got back to the fire, we soaked the corn in water for 15 minutes, and after that it was placed right next to the fire, with the husk still attached. Every few minutes we would turn the ear with a long stick. When the husk was brown, it was done cooking. We made sure to let it cool down before eating, as this method cooks the corn with hot steam, and it will burn you if your not careful.

Categories: Corn, People Tags: , ,

Market Re-Mix

July 30, 2010 Leave a comment
Second Market Offering

Second Market Offering

Here it is market day again, and I’ve delivered my produce to the person who will be selling it. I’ve made it a point this time to be very clear about the entire process, drop off time, profit shares, pickup times, etc… I’ve learned that just because something is agreed upon once, does not mean it will work out. Sometimes plans need to be confirmed a few times, just so everyone is on the same page.

This offering is a bit less then last time, as my family and I have been pickling and eating quite a bit. The onions which were available for the last market are largely diced, bagged and frozen for the winter. The peppers are still growing, and are not yet large enough for sale. They might be a every other week item.

Soon there will be Sweet Corn

Soon there will be Sweet Corn

In the next few weeks, Corn will be ready for the market. My sister Maurice has gained permission from a land owner along 208 to have a garden stand, so I’m planning to build one, and begin stocking it daily. There will be plenty for the market, and a stand very soon.

Ripe Tomato

Ripe Tomato

Another garden crop is starting to ripen. In the last few weeks, I’ve found a few ripe tomatoes here and there, but within the last few days, we’re beginning to find larger clusters which are ripe. Last night, I found a cluster of five, which was the perfect timing for a salad I brought in for my co-workers.

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Things that make me say “Wow”.

July 28, 2010 Leave a comment
Kentucky Pole Beans

Kentucky Pole Beans

I’ve seen a very high trellis on a back road, in a far removed garden, and always thought the owner got carried away when constructing it. I guess the beans are the actor getting carried away thought. These beans have been crowding out weeds, shooting skyward, and I’ve just noticed that they are bending the trellis that supports them. In earlier photos, you may remember how the top beams of this trellis were straight across, they’re not anymore. The vines have been acting like little hydralic jacks, and in there upward growth, as they pull themselves up the trellis, they are compressing the space between cross-members. I will need a much taller support in future gardens.

62 day Corn and 75 days Corn

62 day Corn and 75 days Corn

I wanted to show the difference in two types of corn. The corn on the left is Early Sunglow: 62 day, and on the right is Butter and Sugar: 75 day. I’ve grown five types of corn this year adding Peaches and Cream: 85 day, Blue Dent, and a small corn cob producer to the mentioned varieties above. Notice how the tassles are different colors on these type varieties ? The plants on the left are starting to set small corn cobs… I can’t wait, neither can Michelle, a co-worker who loves Sweet Corn.

Okra Setting a Flower

Okra Setting a Flower

Above is an Okra plant, setting what appears to be a flower, which should be followed with… something. I’m not sure what the produce this plant grows will be. This is a whole new plant to me, and I’m happy to see it make it this far. I’ve been told it will only grow when the tempurature is above 80 F, so it has been a good year to try it out.

Bumble Bee

Bumble Bee

Finally, after being stung by several wasps just a few minutes earlier, I almost walked right into this bumble bee. I was amazed to see the vast amount of what I believe is pollen on it’s hind legs. I took a picture of this not so aggressive bug, and also a video. He worked very fast over this flower, taking care to hit eat pollen producing center, with a speed I wasn’t aware of. He had all of the pollen collected in no time at all.

Categories: Beans, Corn, Wild Animals Tags: , , , , ,